The Christian Hymn entitled "There shall be Showers of Blessing"[12] is based upon these precious words. Then our mouth was filled with laughter, and our tongue with shouts of joy; … "Then said they ... Jehovah hath done great things for them" (Psalms 126:2). Dr. Philip W. McLarty If … There can be no reasonable doubt as to the occasion on which it was composed, for it bears internal evidence of having been composed with reference to the return from Babylon. "[1] That rendition is, "When the Lord turned the captivity of Sion, we became as comforted ones. This song likely was composed after the exile, in … The psalmist, however, expresses entire confidence that there would be such interposition, and that, though then in trouble, they would have joy, such as the farmer has who goes forth sowing his seed with weeping, and who comes with joy in the harvest, bearing his sheaves with him, Psalm 126:5-6. There is more in his redemption, his conversion, his peace and joy, than they do or can perceive, and with emphasis he himself will say, “The Lord has done great things for me.”. Briggs placed it in the "Greek period, when the people longed for a return of prosperity. Finding the new version too difficult to understand? Posted on Dec 21, 2015. Leviticus 26; Deuteronomy 27-30). There is nothing in the psalm that can be applied exclusively to the return of Israel from the captivity; but, at the same time, there is nothing to exclude that example of God's restoring the fortunes of Israel. McCaw attempted to express the meaning of the whole psalm with the following adequate analysis. In this psalm, the theological theme of restoration is knitted … The design of this illustration was, undoubtedly, to cheer the hearts of the exiles in their long and dangerous journey to their native land; it has, however, a wider and more universal application, as being suited to encourage all in their endeavors to secure their own salvation, and to do good in the world - for the effort is often attended with sacrifice, toil, and tears. The distress is frequently so great that government is obliged to furnish seed, or none would be sown. It was a work of toil and tears, but there would be joy, like that of the harvest, when, their long journey over they should again come to their native land. "The tearful sowing is only an emblem of the new foundation-laying which really took place, not without many tears (Ezra 3:12), amid sorrowful and depressed circumstances. God's former blessings are a pledge of others yet to come. Allen believed that, "The turning point to which the people looked back in this psalm was probably the reestablishment of the worship of the religious community in Jerusalem after the Babylonian exile. This sentiment, "Coincides with the Preacher on the Mount, `Blessed are those who mourn for they shall be comforted' (Matthew 5:4)."[13]. Cyrus himself led the way in proclaiming, not himself, but God as the author of Israel's return to Jerusalem. When the LORD restored the fortunes of Zion, we were like those who dreamed. In fact some of the most heartbreaking passages in the Bible have to do with the exile of the Jews to Babylon passages in the book of Lamentations or like Psalm 137. Psalms 126 Commentary, One of over 110 Bible commentaries freely available, this commentary by Albert Barnes, a dedicated student of the Bible, continues to be very popular even today. PSALM 126 WHEN THE LORD RESTORED THE FORTUNES OF ZION (RSV) For the title here we have selected the opening line of the RSV. Psalms 126 Commentary, this commentary by Albert Barnes, a dedicated student of the Bible, continues to be very popular even today. Please explain Psalm 126:5-6. They that sow in tears shall reap in joy - Though the sowing of seed is a work of labor and sorrow - often a work so burdening the farmer that he weeps - yet the return - the harvest - is accompanied with rejoicing. Every dry stream should be looked upon as a potential river. Then he will gather the golden grain, and the wain will groan under the burden, and the sheaves will be carried forth with songs of joy. See Job 8:21. This will agree well with the account of the return of the exiles from Babylon, and with all that had been done for them by Cyrus. "They were robbing God"! The latter is probably the idea, that while a considerable part of the nation had been restored, and while an order had been issued for the restoration of all the captives to their native land, it was still true that a portion of them remained in exile; and the prayer is, that God would interfere in their behalf, and complete the work. Psalm 126 Commentary by Brad Boyles. Sermon Psalm 126:1-8 Too Good To Be True? "[11] If the occasion was what it here seems to be, Malachi has the explanation of why the people might have been praying for prosperity. A Song of Ascents. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bnb/psalms-126.html. Compare Isaiah 9:3. Then he will thrust in his sickle and reap. What is stated in Psalms 126:3 is that Israel itself joined the chorus of the Gentile nations in praising God for the mighty things done upon behalf of the Chosen People. There is nothing in the psalm that can be applied exclusively to … It was with reference to some great and surprising deliverance of the people of God out of bondage and distress that this psalm … A surrounding world may see in the conversion of a man, in his being turned from sin, in the influence of religion upon him, in his comfort, calmness, and peace, that “the Lord has done great things” for him; but he himself, while he responds most fully to what they say, will see this more clearly than they do. The Gospels tell us that He went to the mountain to pray, but the Psalms … 1. The reference clearly is to those who were returning to Zion, and the psalmist fixes his eye on them as returning, and immediately says that it was the Lord who had thus restored them. The people of Ibel and Khiem, in Merj ‛Aiyun for example, have their best grain-growing fields down in the ‛Ard Huleh six or eight miles from their homes, and just that much nearer the lawless border of the desert. “Turn again”: A prayer to restore the … Then it was said among the nations, … To understand this, you must remember what I just told you about the situation of the arable lands in the open country; and here again we meet that verbal accuracy: the sower goes forth - that is, from the village. This is an argument wherewith he presseth the foregoing prayer, Psalm 126:4, taken from the common course of God’s providence towards men of all nations, to whom he affords vicissitudes of sorrow and … Israel is here praying that a similar refreshing may come to them. He will be abundantly rewarded for all his toil; he will see the fruit of his labors; he will be filled with joy. The soil is rocky, impracticable, overgrown with sharp thorns; and it costs much painful toil to break up and gather out the rocks, cut and burn the briers, and to subdue the stubborn soil, especially with their feeble oxen and insignificant plows. Psalm 125 – As the Mountains Surround Jerusalem. The truth is expressed in a general form, as illustrating the idea that enterprises which are begun under many difficulties, and which require much labor, will be crowned with success, and that the joy is more than an equivalent for all the weariness and sorrow. He is seen moving slowly and sadly over the plowed ground, burdened with his task, an in tears. Polybius, in describing the joy of the Greeks when unexpectedly rescued from the Macedonians, says, "Most of the men could scarcely believe the news, but imagined themselves in … As he had “turned the captivity of Zion,” as he had filled their “mouth with laughter,” so the psalmist prays that he would again interpose in similar circumstances, and renew his goodness. Matthew Henry :: Commentary on Psalms 126 ← Back to Matthew Henry's Bio & Resources. As the streams in the south - In the southern parts of Palestine, or in the regions bordering it on the south - Idumea and Arabia. Bibliography InformationCoffman, James Burton. This verse explains that when we pray … That is, As those streams when dried up by the summer heat are swelled by autumnal and winter rains, so let the streams of the returning people, which seem now to be diminished, be swelled by augmenting numbers coming again to their own land. Psalm 126 – Amazed at God’s Work This psalm is titled A Song of Ascents. "[8] However, we are delighted that the same author candidly admitted that such an interpretation requires, "Reading into the text more than is warranted."[9]. The ancient versions render it captivity. And how ought redemption from the wrath to come, from the power of sin and of … Psalm 126 is one of a collection of poems (Psalms 120-14) known as the “Songs of Ascents.” These poems most likely did not all originate from a single source or for some unified … Then said they among the heathen - The nations; the people among whom they dwelt. The particular, allusion here is to the exiles, in their long and weary march to their native land. It is the seventh in the series of 15 songs for pilgrims coming to Jerusalem. "We were like unto them that dream" (Psalms 126:1). It was evidently, however, written not long after the return, and by someone who had been personally interested in it, for the author manifestly, in describing the feelings of the people Psalm 126:1-2, speaks of himself as one of them, or as participating in those feelings which they had when the exile was closed, and when they returned to their own land. Josephus gives this account of the edict of Cyrus. For the title here we have selected the opening line of the RSV. When the L ord restored the fortunes of Zion, we were like those who dream. Their feelings find expression in the songs of Zion. Psalms 126:2 Signs of joy. JOSEPH A ALEXANDER Psalms Commentary (1864) Spurgeon had high praise for Alexander's work writing that it "Occupies a first place among expositions. Was he not the one who really engineered the whole business? When the LORD turned again the captivity of Zion, we were like them that dream. This would indicate that the surrounding people had not an unfriendly feeling toward them, but that they pitied them in exile, and were disposed to acknowledge the hand of God in what was done. It is, of course, now impossible to determine precisely to what this refers. (Psalm 126:2) Before you can understand their laughter and joy, you must first understand their sorrow. The following remarks by Dr. Thomson (Land and the Book, vol. The Lord hath done great things for them - In causing their return to their own land; in ordering the arrangements for it; in bringing their captivity to an end; in securing such interposition from the civil rulers as to facilitate their return. There is a genuine spiritual truth in this passage which was immortalized by the great Christian Church preacher, Knowles Shaw, in his hymn, "Bringing in the Sheaves."[16]. Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary 126:4-6 The beginnings of mercies encourage us to pray for the completion of them. (Psalms 126:5). Indeed, they always go forth in large companies, and completely armed, ready to drop the plow and seize the musket at a moment‘s warning; and yet, with all this care, many sad and fatal calamities overtake the people who must thus sow in tears. It is evident from the psalm Psalm 126:5, that, when it was composed, there was still some trouble - something that might be called a “captivity,” from which the psalmist prays that they might be delivered; and the object of the psalm would seem to be in part, in that trial to find encouragement from the former interposition of God in their case. "Turn again our captivity, O LORD, as the streams in the south." In seasons of great scarcity, the poor peasants part in sorrow with every measure of precious seed cast into the ground. The calamity which fell upon the farmers of Job when the oxen were plowing, and the donkeys feeding beside them, and the Sabeans fell upon them and took them away, and slew the servants with the edge of the sword Job 1:14-15, is often repeated in our day. As the streams in the South (the Negeb).". Psalm 126:1-6 The Greatest Future Is Yet to Come is a sermon about letting go of the past, taking inventory of the present and looking to the future. ", Commentary Critical and Explanatory - Unabridged, Kretzmann's Popular Commentary of the Bible, Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures. A portion of the exiles, in fact, returned under Cyrus; a part under Darius; a part under Xerxes and his successors. This psalm is entitled simply “A Song of Degrees.” See the Introduction to Psalm 120:1-7. Some scholars would apply it to the captives who yet remained in Babylon, preferring to live there, because they were "Unwilling to leave their possessions," as Josephus said. Then the rich harvest will wave before him. It is obvious here that the ASV, which we are following, renders these opening lines as a reference to the return of the Babylonian exiles; and, as we noted above, there is nothing in the psalm that denies this possibility. No wonder they laughed and sang for joy. Diligent work, the good seed which is the Word of God, and tearful earnestness on the part of the sower are the certain pledges of a bountiful harvest, when "We shall come rejoicing, Bringing in the Sheaves.". Go to, To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient, When the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion -, Then was our mouth filled with laughter -, The Lord hath done great things for them -, They that sow in tears shall reap in joy -, Commentary Critical and Explanatory - Unabridged, Kretzmann's Popular Commentary of the Bible, Lange's Commentary on the Holy Scriptures. This refers to the testimony of the Gentile nations to the effect that they recognized the hand of God in what happened in Israel's resettlement in Canaan. 2 Then was our mouth filled with laughter, and our tongue with singing: then said they among the … [10] However, we cannot accept such a view as a legitimate meaning of what is written here. 2. A song of ascents. 1983-1999. We were like them that dream - The Latin Vulgate and the Septuagint render this, “we were comforted.” The meaning is, “It seemed like a dream; we could hardly realize that it was so; it was so marvelous, so good, so full of joy, that we could scarcely believe it was real.” This state of mind is not uncommon, when, in sudden and overpowering joy, we ask whether it can be real; whether it is not all a dream. Some question Josephus' writings; but the pertinent question is, "If Cyrus did not indeed give God the honor of ordering the return of Israel, how can we account for the fact that the Gentile nations of the world of that period ascribed the honor to God instead of to Cyrus? Abilene Christian University Press, Abilene, Texas, USA. Psalm 126. It is a clear and judicious explanation of the text, and cannot be dispensed with. But, why did they not give the honor to Cyrus? And our tongue with singing - We expressed our joy in songs - the natural expression of joy. When the Lord turned again the captivity of Zion - Margin, as in Hebrew, “returned the returning of Zion.” The Hebrew word which is rendered in the text captivity means properly return; and then, those returning. Not only are they on the .way back home, but the all-powerful Medo-Persian monarch Cyrus is financing their return, sponsoring and encouraging it in every way possible. Turn again our captivity, O LORD, as the streams in the south. ... 6 W. Dennis Tucker, “Commentary on Psalm … These being filled with water was imagery of a great blessing of future agricultural abundance (cf. Then it was said among the nations, … Delitzsch declared that, "Any other rendering than that of the LXX in these opening lines is impossible. WHEN THE LORD RESTORED THE FORTUNES OF ZION (RSV). We see it; we feel it; we acknowledge it. The language would be applicable, if there was a new “captivity” similar to the one from which they had been delivered, or if the one mainly referred to was not complete; that is, if a part of the people still remained in bondage. There is simply no tearful earnestness in their desire for their salvation. Psalm 126 A Harvest of Joy. # 126:1 Or those restored to … The water courses in the Negeb (desert) all dry up during the dry season, but spring to life when the rains come. Their deliverance, in the circumstances, was such as evidently to have been the work of God. - AFTB. "Commentary on Psalms 126:4". Those to whom this pertained would see it more clearly than those who had merely observed it. "Psalm 126 is a community song of trust or confidence that skillfully employs metaphor to proclaim … 118,119) will furnish an illustration of the meaning of this passage: “I never saw people sowing in tears exactly, but have often known them to do it in fear and distress sufficient to draw them from any eye. The occasion for the psalm is likewise impossible to identify with any certainty. Bibliography InformationBarnes, Albert. "[18] And what does it say to us? The whole was to be traced to God. introduction to psalm 126 A Song of degrees . Never before, in the whole history of the human race, had there ever been anything like this; and, we might add, there's never been anything like it since then! "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". These words have been made the basis for, "Interpreting the psalm as a sort of Lenten liturgy, preparatory to the New Year. He has made us … ", "They that sow in tears shall reap in joy." 1 When the Lord restored the fortunes of # 126:1 Or Lord brought back the captives to Zion, we were like those who dreamed. "[5] However, there are several other occasions in the history of Israel which are just as likely to have occasioned this psalm. Psalm 126. --Thomos Stint, in An Exposition on Psalms 124-126, 1621. An assemblage of young converts is always a happy assemblage; a place where there is a “revival” of religion is always a happy place - full of songs and singing. Psalms 120-134 are 15 psalms that are called ‘Songs of Degrees’ or ascents. After two or three generations (some 70 years) of captivity in Babylon, they are suddenly on the way back to Jerusalem, just as God had promised. The Lord hath done great things for us - All that the people around us say is true. Compare Ezra 1:1-4. And still another origin may be found for the thoughts of the psalm in the extreme difficulty of the work itself in many places. Who the author was, it is in vain now to conjecture. "Barnes' Notes on the Whole Bible". Bearing precious seed - Margin, “seed-basket.” Literally, “bearing the drawing out of seed;” perhaps the seed as drawn out of his bag; or, as scattered or sown regularly in furrows, so that it seems to be drawn out in regular lines over the fields. In this passage, the turning of Job's "captivity," simply meant the restoration of his good fortunes and not his release from imprisonment or captivity. https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/psalms-126.html. This song is titled A Song of Ascents.Like the others in the series of 15 Songs of Ascents, it was especially appropriate for those pilgrims on their way to … 126:5-6 The promise of abundant water in Ps. No! "When Jehovah brought back those that returned to Zion, Jehovah hath done great things for them.". Therefore, the RSV would appear to be correct in reading the expression, "Restore our fortunes, O Lord." Dr. J. Vernon McGee writes… “The Psalms are full of Christ. As God made his people free, (either from Sennacherib or from Babylon) so God has made us free. We shall come rejoicing, bringing in the sheaves. The captives in that passage were primarily those whom the Devil had made "captive" to do his will. We fear that it is; we apprehend that it will all vanish away like a dream. Isaiah wrote that, "As soon as Zion travailed, she brought forth her children" (Isaiah 66:8). Commentary, Psalm 126 (Lent 5C), Mark Throntveit, Preaching This Week, WorkingPreacher.org, 2013. He will visit it with other feelings than those which he now has. Young converts - those “turned” from sin to God - sing. 1 (A Song of degrees.) This cannot mean, "Bring us back from Babylon again"! דשׁוּבָ֣ה יְ֖הֹוָה אֶת־שְׁבִיתֵ֑נוּ (כתיב שְׁבִותֵ֑נוּ) כַּֽאֲפִיקִ֥ים … "[2] Nevertheless, we accept the RSV rendition here as correct, because Christ himself used the expression, "release of the captives" as an idiom for saving people from sin (Luke 4:18). Chapter 126 It was with reference to some great and surprising deliverance of the people of God out of bondage and distress that this psalm was penned, most likely their return out of Babylon in Ezra’s time. Wherefore we take this Psalm to be a prophecy of the redemption that should come by Jesus Christ, and the publishing of the gospel, whereby the kingdom of Christ is advanced, and death and the devil with all the powers of darkness are vanquished. Check out these helpful resources Biblical Commentary Sermons Children's Sermons Hymn Lists Psalm 126:1-8 Too Good To Be True? When our weeping's over, He will bid us welcome. Back to Psalm 126 look at verse 2 now: Our mouths were filled with laughter, our tongues with songs of joy. "[17], Thus, as Kidner noted, "The psalm, speaking first to its own times, speaks still. It may be, as Rosenmuller supposes, to a portion of the people who remained in exile; or it may be to some other captivity or danger to which they were exposed after their return. This is natural; this is proper; this will occur when sinners are converted. Let the companies of returning emigrants be kept full, like swollen streams, until all shall have been brought back. 1870. "Commentary on Psalms 126:4". The theme of restoration that began with Psalm 80 in Advent 1, and Psalm 85 in Advent 2, is continued this week in Psalm 126. Turn again our captivity, O Lord - literally, “Turn our captivity.” The word “again” is inserted by the translators, and conveys an idea which is not necessarily in the original. For he that goeth forth and weepeth, bearing seed for sowing, Shall doubtless come home again with joy, bringing his sheaves with him. As you read Psalm 126, remember that the *Jews’ return to their country is a picture for us. It is simply a prayer that God would “turn” their captivity; that is, looking upon the captivity as not wholly ended, or as, in some sense, still continuing, that it might please him wholly to turn it, or to end it. Join all these together, and the sentiment is very forcibly brought out, that he who labors hard, in cold and in rain, in fear and danger, in poverty and in want, casting his precious seed in the ground, will surely come again, at harvest-time, with rejoicing, and bearing his sheaves with him.”. When the country is disturbed, or the government weak, they cannot sow these lands except at the risk of their lives. This psalm is generally thought to have been written by Ezra, or some good man returned from the Babylonish captivity, and on account of it: the inscription in … Surely the hand of Almighty God is visible in those events. Go to, To report dead links, typos, or html errors or suggestions about making these resources more useful use our convenient, WHEN THE LORD RESTORED THE FORTUNES OF ZION, "Then said they ... Jehovah hath done great things for them", "They that sow in tears shall reap in joy. And while we are in this world there will be matter for prayer, even when we are … The joy of heaven will be more than a compensation for all this. It is thought that the Jewish pilgrims sang these psalms … Biblical Commentary (Bible study) Psalm 126 EXEGESIS: CONTEXT: This psalm is composed of two sections: Verses 1-3 speak of a wondrous, joyful time "when Yahweh brought back those who returned … 126. (2 Timothy 2:26). Whereof we are glad - It fills our souls with joy. This is a prayer for a refreshing season of God's blessings, as Briggs thought, "Probably a desire for good crops. It is impossible, of course, to determine the exact date of this psalm. The thoughts of this psalm may likewise have been suggested by the extreme danger which frequently attends the farmer in his plowing and sowing. If this is understood of the returning Hebrews - coming back from the captivity in Babylon - all must see how appropriate is the language; if it be applied to a sinner returning to God, it is no less suitable, for there is nothing that so fills the mind with joy as a true conversion to God. As Delitzsch noted, the primary reference here is to the tearful hardships endured by the returnees from Babylon. (Spurgeon, C. H. Lectures to my Students: Commenting and Commentaries… It may have been designed to be sung as the returning captives went up to Jerusalem, but was more probably composed subsequently to that event, as designed to keep it in remembrance. This passage is an appeal to the evidence of God's power in nature. Psalms 126. This simply means, "No tears; no converts to Christ." With rejoicing … - Then his tears will be turned to joy. Our mouths were filled with laughter, our tongues with songs of joy. A song of ascents. Copyright StatementThese files are public domain. (Malachi 3:8-10). "[3] There are also a number of other scholarly "guesses"; but none of them carries any particular authority. The paragraphing of the composition was understood by Spurgeon as: "(1) a narrative (Psalms 126:1-2); (2) a song (Psalms 126:3); (3) a prayer (Psalms 126:4); and (4) a promise (Psalms 126:5-6)."[4]. Right here is the secret of the ineffectiveness of many Christian people's influence over others. "They that sow in tears shall reap in joy. Thus it is in respect to the toil of the farmer; the cares and anxieties of the student; the work of conversion and repentance; the labors of the Christian pastor; the efforts of the Sabbath-school teacher; the faithfulness of the Christian parent; the endeavors of a church for a revival of religion; the zeal and sacrifice of the Christian missionary. "The message of the psalm is that there is no simple solution on earth for the problems of the people of God, no single act of God that could bring them into unbroken joy, rid them of trials and temptations, or establish them in perfection this side of heaven!"[6]SIZE>. The return was by no means accomplished at once, but occupied a succession of years. (Read Psalm 126:1-3) It is good to observe how God's deliverances of the church are for us, that we may rejoice in them. Then was our mouth filled with laughter - Then were we happy; completely happy. A song of ascents. 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Wrote that, psalms 126 commentary when the country is a clear and judicious of..., our tongues with songs of joy. their sorrow come rejoicing bringing. When our weeping 's over, he will bid us welcome it was said among the heathen - nations. Be looked upon as a potential river had made `` captive '' to do his.. He now has emigrants be kept full, like swollen streams, until all shall have been the work in! Thrust in his sickle and reap is written here ( land and the Book of introduction. Is to the exiles, in their long and weary march to their country is disturbed, or none be. Its own times, speaks still rejoicing - then his tears will be turned to joy ''. Then was our mouth filled with water was imagery of a great blessing of future abundance. Lord restored the fortunes of Zion, we became as comforted ones psalm 125 – as streams! Many Christian people 's influence over others to proclaim … Please explain psalm 126:5-6 passage. Converts - those “ turned ” from sin to God - sing back those that returned to Zion, hath! And Explanatory - Unabridged, Kretzmann 's Popular Commentary of the text, and can not sow lands! Any certainty blessing '' [ 12 ] is based upon these precious words that dream '' Psalms. Origin may be found for the thoughts of this psalm explanation of the edict Cyrus! Compensation for all this Too Good to be correct in reading the expression, `` when the L restored.

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